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Fuck Yeah, Medieval!

Funne factes

mediumaevum:

Here, feast your eyes! 3508*4535
And instead of a description:

mediumaevum:

Here, feast your eyes! 3508*4535

And instead of a description:

(via medieval)

(via CSI: Normandy - Historic LOL - Captioned Portraits of Yore)
So I did about 30 seconds worth of search engine digging and came upon this fabulous Tumblr:
Fuck Yeah Bayeux Tapestry!
The generator seems to be down or missing or something, so I has a sad.

(via CSI: Normandy - Historic LOL - Captioned Portraits of Yore)

So I did about 30 seconds worth of search engine digging and came upon this fabulous Tumblr:

Fuck Yeah Bayeux Tapestry!

The generator seems to be down or missing or something, so I has a sad.

(via Duel - Historic LOL - Captioned Portraits of Yore)
Thinking about the Bayeux tapestry.
If you know one date in British history, let it be 1066. Guillaume le Conquérant was all like, “Harold II, Imma let you finish, but the Norman army totally had the best battles of the year.” Then he pwned their English faces and made everyone in England speak French, which, let’s face it, they still haven’t gotten over.

(via Duel - Historic LOL - Captioned Portraits of Yore)

Thinking about the Bayeux tapestry.

If you know one date in British history, let it be 1066. Guillaume le Conquérant was all like, “Harold II, Imma let you finish, but the Norman army totally had the best battles of the year.” Then he pwned their English faces and made everyone in England speak French, which, let’s face it, they still haven’t gotten over.

The Burghers of Calais

King Edward III of England (b. 1312, d. 1377) spent most of his fifty-year reign at war, first with Scotland and then with France. Although contrary to the romantic interpretation of medieval warfare that has been glorified in Hollywood films, wars in the Middle Ages were not often won or lost by pitched battle. War “cruel and sharp” was a slow, torturous process. The siege was arguably the most common form of encounter during this period, and with siege came famine, disease, and destruction. Edward was particularly famous for his chevauchées, mounted raids that left great swathes of countryside devastated. As a result, besieged cities were often surrounded by miles of burnt and decimated land.

This sculpture by Auguste Rodin is of the surrender of the Burghers of Calais to Edward in 1347. Standard siege practice included negotiations, both for conditional respite and surrender. The law of storm technically allowed a besieging army to ignore the clemency requests of the inhabitants, but forethought dictated leniency: if Edward showed mercy, perhaps the French would show mercy in the future if the situation happened to be reversed. Instead of massacring the whole population of Calais, Edward agreed to only take a few important men of the city —Jean Froissart writes six, which is likely what Rodin referred to, but other sources like the Chronicle of St. Omer indicate that there were eight men—into custody and have them put to death. The men came out from the town dressed humbly, carrying the keys to the city. 

"And then he said to them: ‘Oh you of Calais, where did you find the heart to dare to hold out so against me? And did you not realize that I am more powerful than you, and that I had made an oath to conquer you? You held out against me wrongly, and therefore I will not have any pity on you." (St. Omer Chronicle as quoted in The Wars of Edward III by Clifford Rogers, 143)

According to the sources, Edward’s Queen, who was heavily pregnant, and many members of the royal retinue fell to their knees and asked Edward to grant the Burghers mercy, which he agreed to do.

"And then the councilors of the King of England took four knights and four bourgeois, who came to present themselves in front of the King, each knight with a naked sword in his hands, each burger with a noose in his arms." (Ibid) 

If you look closely at the sculpture, you can see one man holding the keys to the city, and the nooses around their necks.

The Met has a brilliant little pdf about the sculpture and the history.

fuckyeahmedievalart:

Merlin dictating his prophecies to his scribe, Blaise; French 13th century minature from Robert de Boron’s Merlin en prose.

fuckyeahmedievalart:

Merlin dictating his prophecies to his scribe, Blaise; French 13th century minature from Robert de Boron’s Merlin en prose.

When you feel you must know everything to say anything, and you end up saying nothing.

When you feel you must know everything to say anything, and you end up saying nothing.

Some fun facts about bows and arrows:
At the Second Lateran Council in 1139, Pope Innocent II banned the crossbow from warfare because it was a gruesome and deadly weapon unfit for Christian use.
Richard the Lion Heart died after a rogue arrow pierced his armor and the wound became gangrenous. 
(via Invisible - Lolcats ‘n’ Funny Pictures of Cats - I Can Has Cheezburger?)

Some fun facts about bows and arrows:

At the Second Lateran Council in 1139, Pope Innocent II banned the crossbow from warfare because it was a gruesome and deadly weapon unfit for Christian use.

Richard the Lion Heart died after a rogue arrow pierced his armor and the wound became gangrenous. 

(via Invisible - Lolcats ‘n’ Funny Pictures of Cats - I Can Has Cheezburger?)

The seven deadly sins are found in this verse:
Pride, anger, sloth,
Gluttony and greed,
Envy, lust are deadly sins,
So Christians all take heed.

—"A York Priest’s Notebook" (late 1470s)

Also, priests should warn their parishioners not to put their little ones in the same bed with them so that they will not accidentally roll over on them or suffocate them and thereby be found guilty of homicide. Nor should they carelessly restrain them in their cradles or leave them unattended day or night because of the danger that the baby’s mouth might be covered by the bedding even for a short time which could easily prove fatal.

—William of Pagula, Oculus sacerdotis (“The Priest’s Eye”) (c. 1320-23) 

Artist Jeff DeBoer makes plate armor and chainmail, etc, for animals. Pretty much amazing. Click through to Cats and Mice to see the whole collection.

Artist Jeff DeBoer makes plate armor and chainmail, etc, for animals. Pretty much amazing. Click through to Cats and Mice to see the whole collection.

The Black Death devastated Europe between 1348 and 1350, killing millions of people. Some estimates put the death toll at over half of the European population. Many folks believed that the plague was a sign of the impending apocalypse. 
 radicaltraditionalism:

Skeletal Horseman from the Apocalypse Tapestry, circa 14th century. 

The Black Death devastated Europe between 1348 and 1350, killing millions of people. Some estimates put the death toll at over half of the European population. Many folks believed that the plague was a sign of the impending apocalypse. 

 radicaltraditionalism:

Skeletal Horseman from the Apocalypse Tapestry, circa 14th century. 

(via old-glory)

Verily. Medieval Skeptics.

Verily. Medieval Skeptics.

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